Wednesday, June 30, 2010

The Foot Tattoo and Its Popularity

There are great differences among tattoos in today's world, which is why they represent a great way by which to express your individuality. You are in control of deciding what kind of tattoo you want and where on your body you want to display it. This means that what may be the best one for you, may not suit other people at all. But don't despair if you are still not entirely certain just what part of your body you want to have a tattoo on. You may consider a foot tattoo. These kinds of tattoos are very popular these days.

Here are some things to consider:

Tattoo sessions on the foot tend to be more painful, as a rule. The reason is due to the fact that the skin is close to the bone. And the closer the bone is to the skin, the more painful a tattoo will be. Tattoos on the foot, though, will be smaller, so you won't have to put up with the pain for long.

Foot tattoos are also more easily concealed than any other kinds. If you hope to have a professional job some day, concealment might come in handy, since in professional jobs tattoos are usually not in. So your ability to conceal a foot tattoo is a good thing.

But you should be aware of the fact that during the healing process you can't enclose your tattooed foot in a shoe, so open shoes are in order. The healing time for a tattoo is usually 2 to 3 weeks. If you can't avoid wearing shoes, then keep in mind that you must have 2 pairs of light socks on.

Did you know that a foot tattoo is considered sexy? There are many opinions about the types of tattoos that look good on people. The thing about foot tattoos is that even people who don't as a rule like tattoos, seem to like them on the foot.

Foot tattoos are likely to need touching up from time to time. The reason for this is due to extra exposure to conditions less favorable than on other parts of your body. A foot tattoo may also spread and end up looking blurry.

Star designs or words or even flowers are popular foot tattoos. But there is no reason why you can't engage your tattoo artist to help you create something really different. If you do want a larger and more complex tattoo than those in the ordinary runs of the mill, keep in mind that these will be more painful and more expensive, too.

Tribal Tattoo Designs For The Foot, Shoulder And Back

There seems to be an explosion in the popularity of tribal tattoos. Specifically, shoulder and back tribal pieces. Everywhere you look, from celebrity to Average Joe, someone has got a beautiful, striking tribal tattoo on their shoulder. Or they have the the tribal tattoo that goes from one shoulder, across the back, and down the other shoulder. Why are they fast becoming the most popular tattoo? How do you choose the best tribal tattoo design for you? Do a little research. Check out tribal tattoo designs in your culture or heritage. You are sure to get tons of ideas. I did a little research on tribal tattoos, and I now have a few theories as to the popularity surge. Probably the most important of all of these theories is that tribal shoulder tattoos look so cool!

Tribal tattoos were used in different cultures to delineate between the tribes. They were also used to distinguish between classes or rank within the tribe. Everyone in the tribe had some form of the tattoo. In most cultures, the tattoos were given in a ceremonial way, to celebrate the passage from childhood to adulthood.

It is widely believed that the Polynesian culture brought us our most popular tribal tattoos. The Samoans, the Maori, the Hawaiians. The most detailed of these are the Maori. These tattoos are intricate and curvilinear in nature. They are based on the spiral which give them such powerful movement within the design. The design begins in the center and radiates out, forming beautiful curves that are filled with pattern. The tribal tattoos were carved into the skin and rubbed with ash. Maori tattoos were placed on the face, back, chest, and arms. The more important you were, the more tattooing you had.

The traditional Samoan tattoo consists of very detailed geometric patterns. Traditionally, they cover a man from his waist to his knees. Woman have the same tattooing, but it is not as detailed or dense. A more modern Hawaiian Tattoo is the shoulder tattoo. Images are rich with geometric design.

The Celts and Danes tattooed their family crest on themselves. The ancient Egyptians tattooed themselves as a form of adornment.

In Japan, woman that were of age and getting married were tattooed. If a woman was not properly tattooed, she was thought to have committed a sin and was sentenced to death. (Yikes!)

The Christians tattooed Jesus Fish on themselves. The Native American Indians tattooed animals and images that linked them to a tribe. The ancient Mexico, the Aztecs tattooed images of their slain enemies.

So, each culture seems to have some form of tattooing in their ancient history. Does our love affair with tribal tattoos have roots in our wanting to belong? Is it pride in our heritage? Is it our personal passage into adulthood? I think it is all of the above. A little bit of heritage, a little culture, a feeling of inclusion. There is nothing like a powerful, beautiful shoulder tattoo that is meaningful to you.

Whatever your reason, tribal tattoos are really intricate in nature, and powerful in design. Find the right one and you will be happy with it forever. Don't spend enough time looking and tweaking the design, and you will be very unhappy. Tribal tattoos are generally large and most have a lot of black. Difficult to cover over, and difficult to remove. Think hard, do your research, find an excellent tattoo artist, and you will be all set. Peace always.

Monday, June 28, 2010

Sexy Tattoo Designs For Girls - The Best Foot and Sleeve Tattoos

There are so many great tattoo designs for girls these days it is really amazing. In fact there are so many great looking tattoo designs for girls these days that it can be hard to narrow down the choices and find something that works for you. Two of the most currently popular trends for tattoo designs for women are tattoos for foot and sleeve tattoo designs. If you are looking for a tattoo design for either of these super sexy locations here are some great ideas.

Tattoos For Foot

Of course the foot is a small area or canvas to work from so if you are truly considering getting a foot tattoo you should try and find a design that can be small and not too intricate. If the design is too intricate it will late fade and blur.

Star Foot Tattoo - One of the most popular options these days are the star foot tattoo. The stars have always fascinated people and human throughout our short time here on earth. There are so many mysteries behind stars that they can make a great and highly symbolic tattoo.

Flower Foot Tattoo - Anther great option is to get a flower foot tattoo design hat you like. There are so many different possibilities with a flower tattoo design. One should start by deciding what is important in their life that holds meaning and significance for them. Then they can locate a great looking flower that symbolizes those things.

Sleeve Tattoo Designs

Sleeve tattoo designs can be done as a full sleeve going from wrist to shoulder. A half sleeve ranging from elbow to should and a quarter sleeve tattoo which is typically just done around the shoulder and upper part of the arm. More and more women are choosing to get sleeve tattoos or what is called getting sleeved. Here are some of the more popular ideas and tattoo design styles for feminine sleeve tattoo design.

Koi Fish Sleeve Design - The koi fish is obviously a very traditional and Japanese tattoo design that used to be done very large in full body tattoo suits worn by the Yakuza. However, today many women are getting this traditional tattoo with the beautiful new colored inks available these days.

Floral Sleeve Designs - Another popular option for women is a floral tattoo. This could be anything from a gothic looking vampire flower or a lotus flower symbolizing a journey and transformation typically religious but these days just a great classic tattoo design.

Sexy Tattoo Ideas

When a female has decided to get a tattoo coping with the pain is the easy part, picking a design that will speak to her soul but also make her feel sexy is the real trick. Many woman have no idea what to get a tattoo of much less how getting the right tattoo design will positively effect there self esteem.

A classic tattoo idea is to tattoo tribal or flower designs along the lower back. Always a feminine spot to get a tattoo the lower back is probably the sexiest place a woman can get work done. Unlike other parts of the body where the subject matter must be considered,most tattoo designs no matter what the subject matter will look cute and girlish on the lower back.

A small symbol looks quite sexy peeking from the nape of a female's neck. A big part of the draw of female tattoos is only seeing part of the tattoo adding to the mystery of the design. This is exactly the case with neck tattoos. Chinese symbols often work well on the neck as do small religious symbols or a loved one's initials.

A more recent trend with female tattooing that proves to be quit sexy is tattooing the rib cage. Often you will find a small framed large breasted young lady with a large tattoo peeking from behind her bra strap under her arm. The mystery of the tattoo is truly the sexiest part and the allure of the design under the bra is intoxicating.

Tattoo Designs For Women - Sexy, Cute and Feminine Tattoos For Women

Tattoo Designs For WomenTattoo designs for women should be expressive and significant enough to highlight the natural's subtlety and beauty of the female's body. After all, women resort to tattoos to define a part of their personality and exude their charm and sexuality. Therefore, careful planning and forethought should be exerted when planning what tattoo designs to go for.

Whatever tat image a woman go for, it will be forever a definition of a part of her personality. If she wants to express it right, she should get something that has significance and personal meaning to her. Here are some of the most popular and favored tattoo designs that women usually go for.

Flower Tattoos
Flowers are beautiful and perhaps, one of nature's best gift. With their aesthetic appeal and deep symbolical meaning, it is no surprise that they usually end up tattooed on a woman's skin. Some of the most popular floral tats are cherry blossoms, lotus, lilies and roses. For a more tropical flair, Hawaiian flower tattoos like hibiscus, plumeria and orchid are preferred.

Butterfly Tattoos
Butterflies have colorful hues and interesting shapes not to mention the symbolical meaning attached to them. They signify change, transformation and new life which are all aspects in life that women can relate to. The loveliness of the butterfly plus the profound representation they possess made them a classic tattoo design among women.

Stars
Stars are perhaps one of the oldest symbols and women love them because of their simplicity and flexibility. They can literally be tattooed anywhere on the body and still look great and interesting. They are rendered on the skin either as a lone star, group of stars and the very popular shooting star tattoos.

Fairy and Angel
Fairies are fun, mythical creatures that seem to be a symbol for women as being carefree, naughty and free. Their magical powers and fantasy allure not to mention their exquisite appearance are the very reasons why fairy tattoos are very much a favorite tat theme among women. Angels on the other hand are seen as guardians and protectors so they definitely symbolize that notion whenever a woman has it tattooed on her body. The angel wings tattoo, on the other hand are commonly inked on a woman's back and supposedly represent the desire to fly.

Animals and Insects
There are several animals that can be commonly seen tattooed on a woman's body. They are usually the ones that are tame and not so wild that men usually go for. Birds like swallow and sparrow are hit among women. Fish and dolphin are friendly animal creatures that women love to be tattooed on their body. Insects like lady bug and especially dragonflies are also favored by women because of their interesting colors and significant meaning.

When it comes to locations of tattoos, there are also top favorites among women depending on their design of choice. For small and simple tat, the foot, ankle and wrist are favorite locations. For intricate and detailed tattoo designs, the rib cage, back, shoulder blade and lower stomach are the choice tattoo locations for women

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Tribal Tattoos - The Blending Of Cultures

The New Era Of Tribal Tattoo Designs

A look that seems so simple at times, tribal tattoos have become very fashionable and the trend for getting tribal tattoo designs are more popular then ever. They have edge their way to the top of the body-art world with it's striking bold designs and looks that many find appealing.

modern tribal tattoosTribal Tattoo Designs
Some of the first modernized tribal tattoos designs.


Poly Tribal Tat The first recognized tribal tattoos were those of the south pacific. Polynesian islands such as Samoa, Fiji, Tahiti and others, all had their own culture influence designs. These tattoos had sacred meanings that ran deep in their heritage compared to those you see today. The tribal style seen today was innovated by pacific islander Leo Zulueta who was training under Ed Hardy at the time. He searched and studied the designs of "traditional culture tattoos" and soon came up with his own artwork and bought forth ideas that everyone could use. Since then it has grown into new levels of artistry, that has been taking the tattoo community by storm.

tribal tattoos


Tribal Tattoos, although they may appear to be plain at times, they are without a doubt still one of the most popular designs today. In this article you will find helpful ideas, especially for those of you who are new to this tattoo style. Explore the history of this beautiful art form that has been around for just a couple of decades. Find many helpful ideas to inspire a cool custom design of your own.

Tribal Arm Tattoo
Tribal Arm Tattoo


The majority of tribal tattoos found these days have few similarities to those of the Polynesians who used black lines, shapes, patterns and other geometric designs. To some people they might seem similar but the traditional tribal tattoos of the Polynesians has history and meaningful symbolism behind them.


Tribal
Tribal



In 1982, Leo Zulueta under the direction and encouragement of Ed Hardy, they were both responsible for an increasing demand of Tribal Tats in America when they started a tattoo magazine called "Tattoo Time". Featuring native Samoan and Borneo tattoos, from then on this style grew to become one of the most popular tattoos today. Most tattoo enthusiasts have gotten marked with this style of tribal tattoo design, making it one of the top designs at this moment.

tribal tattooAs pointed out above, these modern day tattoos has a connection with natives and tribes from many different parts of the world. It was from them that this style of tattooing has evolved into the modern tribal tattoo designs we see today. Early on there were some tattoo parlors and tattoo artists that would not even touch a tribal design, feeling that they were too simple of a design. But it wouldn't take them much longer to realize that the tribal design required a lot of skills as well as patience to tattoo the intricate designs.

When you decide on getting a tribal tat, you'll discover that there is a huge collection of tribal designs ranging from small and simple to much larger extravagant ones. There's a vast selection of ideas that can be combined with these tattoos. When creating your own, give it a personal touch that you can relate and connect to. Express your individuality and personality. Be daring and get creative as tribal tattoos always portray a side of beauty and are magnificent works of art.

Japanese sonic tattoo style

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0sjVwwlHhqc/SxzQinEWBNI/AAAAAAAAG9Y/5ues62tbBfw/s320/sonic-tattoo-sleeve.jpg

Japanese sonic tattoo style

Friday, June 25, 2010

Japanese Tree Tattoo Design

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Japanese Tree Tattoo Design Full Back Body Man

Japanese Flower tattoo girls

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Japanese Flower and Girl Tattoo Design on Back Girl

Japanese Dragon Tattoo Design

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Japanese Dragon Tattoo Design in Side Man

Amazing Colorful Back Tattoo

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Amazing Colorful Back Tattoo

With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery

Amazing Art of Arm Japanese Tattoo Ideas With Koi Fish Tattoo Designs With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery 1

Amazing Art of Arm Japanese Tattoo Ideas With Koi Fish Tattoo Designs With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery 2

Amazing Art of Arm Japanese Tattoo Ideas With Koi Fish Tattoo Designs With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery 3

Amazing Art of Arm Japanese Tattoo Ideas With Koi Fish Tattoo Designs With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery 4

Amazing Art of Arm Japanese Tattoo Ideas With Koi Fish Tattoo Designs With Image Arm Japanese Koi Fish Tattoo Gallery 5

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Orchid Tattoo Designs and Meanings

Tattoo Design - What Orchids Mean

Orchid Tattoo DesignsOrchids are a graceful flower, making them an ideal tattoo for many women. Their elegant appearance, attracts many into getting tattoos of orchids. The beauty that belongs to them as an exotic flower kindles a sensation of being pure and innocent. There are many designs of orchids you can select from in making it your own personalized tattoo.

Orchid tattoo designs have many beautiful meanings and is a perfect way of expressing your feelings of love, adoration and respect. Like many other flowers, the orchid has found its way into the world of tattooing for its beauty and its attractiveness. Although the orchid is not as common as the rose tattoo, the orchid stands out more prominent in its originality and design. Making the orchid tattoo very unique and special.


Orchid Tattoos
Orchid Tattoos

Phoenix Bird With Orchid Flower Tattoo
Phoenix Bird With Orchid Flower Tattoo


The meanings of orchids are very symbolic, that being of rare and delicate beauty. There are several meanings that the orchid can be attributed to. It can express the everlasting feelings of love. You can get a orchid tattoo to symbolize the love you have for someone dear to you. Orchids can represent beauty as that in nature and life. In the Chinese culture it is a symbol for "many children."


Orchid Tattoo Orchid tattoos can be placed almost anywhere on the body. The tattoo design can either be large or small in size depending on your preference. Orchids can be done in a large variety of colors, with white being the most popular used, but you may choose your favorite. A personal touch such as a adding a loved ones name to the tattoo design of an orchid holds the meaning closer to its own symbolic roots.


Orchid Tattoo


Just as with other flower designs they are endless possibilities and ideas you can come up with. Create your own tattoo design to satisfy your inner self. Always remember that a tattoo is not just an image, but are symbols that represents special meanings behind them. Feel free to browse some pictures of flower tattoos and other interesting tattoo designs. Hope this article was helpful. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Tattoo-Design---What-Orchids-Mean&id=4473757

Tattoo Aftercare Instructions

Tattoo Aftercare Guide
Author: Alexander
Tattoo Aftercare

How well a tattoo ages and how long the colors remain vibrant are most affected by the first three weeks of aftercare given a new tattoo. That statement implies what often goes unstated in the world of tattooing but what is tacitly understood by all—that tattoos do change over time. Because we know that the skin is constantly changing, we know that the appearance of a tattoo must also change. As skin stretches or shrinks, becomes injured, or simply ages, tattoos also stretch, shrink, and age. In addition, certain colors (red) are more likely to fade than others (blue) and will change more quickly.

This articles describes the changes that the tattooed can expect and how they can help to mitigate unwanted changes with detailed aftercare information and also preventative measures that can be taken during the lifetime of the tattoo.

Transition

It's natural to keep looking at your new tattoo in the mirror at this point, so don't feel too narcissistic. People in the shop will no doubt be looking also. Now that the tattoo is complete, your artist will dispose of all the single-use items and remove the tattoo machine for later disassembly so that the tubes and needles can be cleaned and sterilized. The work area will have the Saran wrap removed, if it was used, and then he wiped down, just as when the whole process started.

The healing process begins almost immediately but your best and first layer of protection, your skin, has been penetrated. Your tattoo artist will take immediate steps to address that situation. Your tattoo will be cleaned with alcohol one last time—the cool feeling is a relief to the hot sensation caused by the swelling. A final coat of Vaseline (or other topical ointment of choice) will be applied, and then a bandage. That's right, your brand-new tattoo is going to be hidden for its first several hours. The bandages vary from shop to shop, even from tattoo to tattoo. Sometimes a sterile pad with medical tape is used. Other tattoos, however, like a very large back piece, are impossible to bandage in that way. Instead, Saran wrap alone, held down by medical tape, might be used. The purpose of the bandage is to prevent infection and promote healing. Any sterile bandage material that accomplishes those goals is good for the task. Other options include a nonstick Telfa pad, and even a diaper for an awkward position on the body.

Your tattooist will tell you what to do to care for your new tattoo. These do's and don'ts are the all-important aftercare instructions. The burden of infection prevention now shifts to you. Despite all efforts made on your behalf by the tattoo your artist, assuming that you're happy with your new tattoo and you can afford it. Tip or not, though, if you're happy with your tattoo, you might want to say so before you leave.

Also at this point, tattoo artists sometimes like to snap a quick photo of the piece before you leave. Ideally, they'd like to get a nice photograph for their portfolio or Web site when the tattoo is completely healed. But that would mean that clients would have to come back for the express purpose of providing a photo op—which rarely happens. Instead, most tattoo photos are taken right after the tattoo is done. Occasionally, clients return for more tattoos, providing an opportunity to photograph the healed piece.

Aftercare Calendar

The next couple of weeks are a critical time for you and your new tattoo, which is why tattoo shops will go to the trouble of providing written aftercare instructions for their clients. If you've looked into aftercare at all, though, you quickly realize that these instructions vary from shop to shop, and they have also changed over time. There are a few reasons for that variation. Different products for aftercare are available in different places, even on the same continent.

Tattoo artists may he apprenticed using certain products and may keep using them even when they move off and set up their own shop. Experience and a history with these aftercare products is important in the same way that experience is important for the choice of tattoo inks. Confidence in a product or technique builds over years of working with hundreds if not thousands of clients.

But with all the variation of time, place, and tattooist, there still remain some broad and common themes that run through aftercare instructions. The common denominator is twofold: preventing infection and promoting healing. Add to that a third goal of trying to retain as much ink as possible in the tattoo and you begin to understand the reasoning behind all aftercare instructions. The following is a generic aftercare calendar of what you can expect during the first few weeks with your new tattoo and what you need to do to take care of it.

DAY 1: This is the big day—the day you're tattooed. Although most tattoo artists will instruct you to leave your bandage on for a minimum of two hours and hopefully somewhere between two and twelve hours, what they're really shooting for is that you'll leave it on overnight. You want the tattoo to remain moist and protected for as long as possible. Don't go overboard with this, though. Leaving the bandage on overnight prevents the new tattoo from sticking to your pajamas or sheets on that first night, but the next morning should be considered the upper limit on how long the bandage should stay in place. Ideally then, on Day 1, you will not see, let alone touch, your new tattoo.

DAY 2: Wash your hands! Always, before touching your tattoo, including removing the bandage, wash your hands with an antibacterial soap. Let this become your new ritual, much like the tattoo artists before they put on their gloves. Remove the bandage, slowly, in case it has stuck to the tattoo. If that's happened, then moisten the bandage with warm water (in the shower might be the easiest way) until it comes free without pulling. Gently, oh so gently, wash your new tattoo with a mild soap and warm water. Your goal is to remove any blood, lymph fluid, ink, or Vaseline that was left on the surface of the skin. You don't want to scrub or even use a washcloth. Instead, use your clean hands and gently work off anything that is on the surface. Don't soak your tattoo for the sake of soaking it, though. Once it's clean, stop washing it. Pat it dry with a clean towel, taking care never to rub it. This is probably your first long look at it, all clean and new in its pristine glory. You will not be applying a new bandage.

Exception #1 in the aftercare game: The vast majority of people will not need a second bandage, but occasionally the double bandage is the best course for some people. Folks who are prone to scabbing or thick scabs or who have an impaired ability for the skin to heal itself or whose ink just doesn't seem to stay (which you would only know from past tattoo experi- ence) might try a second bandage—but probably for not more than another twelve hours. After washing as above, apply another clean coat of Vaseline (or whatever product was used) and rebandage (with the same type of dressing as was used initially, or perhaps just Saran wrap and medical tape).

As the skin of the new tattoo heals, you want to keep it moist. How to prevent scabbing, which removes color from the tattoo and which would also create itching and the temptation to touch the tattoo, even scratch it. In order to prevent drying, you'll use a cream to moisturize the tattoo. How often and how much? You want to use enough so that the tattoo doesn't feel tight, dry, or itchy, and you want to achieve a thin coating, since you don't want to clog the pores.

What type of cream or lotion should you use? There are many from which to choose, and every tattooer and artist will recommend something different. What it amounts to, though, is label reading. You want to avoid alcohol since it will dry the skin. At this point, you also want to avoid oil, grease, petrolatum (which is in Vaseline), and lanolin (animal oil extracted from wool) since these will clog pores. You want to avoid fragrance since it doesn't do anything for you and could prove to be an irritant to freshly tattooed skin. What are your choices? They fall into two main categories: products made just for tattoo aftercare and products you can buy at any drugstore, grocery store, or pharmacy.

Specialized tattoo products (Tattoo Goo, Black Cat Super Healing Salve, THC Tattoo Aftercare, etc.) may be no better or worse than regular moisturizers at the supermarket. Again, it amounts to label reading. Some of these specialized products, typically sold in tattoo parlors, contain beeswax or dyes and fragrance. Some contain mixtures of homeopathic herbs, vitamins, and oils. Regular moisturizers and lotions (Curd, Lubriderm, A and D Ointment) are much the same, without the cool packaging and the word "tattoo" in the name. Again, these may contain petrolatum or lanolin and dyes and fragrances. You ideally want something as moist and neutral in terms of its chemical composition as possible.

An antibiotic cream perhaps? Well, here's the deal with that. Many, many, many people use antibiotic creams in the aftercare of their new tattoo (like Neosporin, Polysporin, Bacitracin, Bepanthen, etc.). An antibiotic, however, is for killing bacteria and these may not, hopefully will not, be present. Antibiotic creams do not necessarily promote healing. in addition, in a very small percentage of people who are allergic to certain antibiotics, a relatively high dose through all those punctures in the skin can lead to the ultimate in allergic reactions, anaphylactic shock—a full-body allergic reaction that is characterized by breathing difficulty and plummeting blood pressure. So, while an antibiotic isn't really necessary unless an infection develops, it will do no harm unless you just happen to be allergic to it.

Avoid wearing tight, restrictive clothes—including shoes if your new tattoo is on your foot—right over the top of the new tattoo. Wear clothing that breathes, allowing fresh air to reach the tattoo, cotton being ideal. No nylon stockings, for example, or polyester shirts. They don't breathe, and they can also stick to a new tattoo.

You might also want to avoid hard workouts that flex the new tattoo or cause excessive sweating. Remember that your skin is healing, and these first few weeks are critical to the final look and longevity of your tattoo. A small amount of prevention now is worth untold rewards later.

So, on Day 2, remember to wear appropriate clothing and take your moisturizer with you, along with some antibacterial hand wipes or liquid to wash your hands before you moisturize your tattoo.

DAY 3: Take your shower as normal and do your best not to soak your tattoo, although you can gently wash it as on Day 2. Wash your hands and apply your moisturizer as often as necessary to keep the tattoo from getting dry.

DAYS 4 To 14: Unless you notice signs of an infection or allergic reaction, your tattoo will go through a couple of different phases in this two-week time period. Ideally, your tattoo will not actually scab in the sense that we normally think of it. Instead, the colored and damaged epidermis may simply peel, just like a sunburn, becoming flaky and falling off. Like a sunburn, you don't want to help it. Never scratch or pick at the skin (or scab) of your new tattoo. Never, never, never. The thinner the scab, if there is one, the better, even paper thin. Thick scabs delay healing and can remove color from the new tattoo. Adhere strictly to the "NOs" in the first two weeks. If itching is driving you crazy, you might resort to an antihistamine, but check with your doctor first.

DAYS 15 TO 21: In general, tattoos will he completely healed somewhere between two and three weeks, although most will take only two weeks. Until your tattoo has completely peeled or the scab has completely fallen away, your tattoo is not complete. Even if the peeling has finished or the scab is gone, the new epidermal layer that forms over your tattoo is going to be quite sensitive. By week three, if your tattoo is completely healed, you should still avoid sun, although you can go back to all your other vices—swimming, sauna, etc.

Just as when you sat down for your tattoo and signed your contract, remember that tattoo artists are not medical doctors. The guidelines that they give you and the guidelines given above are just that: generic guidelines which work for the majority of the populace. Only a medical doctor can give you medical advice and he or she is the only person that you should be consulting for such advice. Don't rely on what your friends say or have done. Don't rely on word of mouth. Your primary sources of information are your tattoo artist, in the form of aftercare instructions and based on experience, and your doctor, based on training.

Public Enemy Number One

Once your tattoo has completely healed, feel free to frolic in the hot tub and splash in chlorinated beverages all you like. When it comes to the sun, though, from here on out it is your tattoo's number one enemy--Destroyer of Pigment, Vanquisher of Color, Fader of All Things Once Bright. It's ironic, of course. You want nothing more than for your friends to see your new tattoo. Hell, for strangers to see it too. But tattoo viewings are best left to the great indoors, no matter what the beach at spring break looks like.

You're used to the sun having an effect on your skin. In response to the radiation of the sun, it gets darker. You get a tan. That happens to all skin types, from white to black and everything in between. The pigment is called melanin and it's produced by melanocytes in the epidermis. In darker skin, melanin is in a constant state of production. However, melanin is not produced in response to all radiation; it is specifically counteracting ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The skin produces melanin in response to UV light as a protective mechanism so that the melanin can absorb the UV radiation and protect other cells from UV damage. That's all well and good and right. But consider how a darker epidermis affects the look of your tattoo. In order to see your tattoo, remember, you are looking through the epidermis. The darker the window, the darker the tattoo will look.

Fade Out

Tattoos fade just like all other color that comes under the rays of the sun. The technical term is photodegradation. Like the snapshot that you left on your dashboard for months or the red heart in bumper stickers that say "I [heart symbol] Pain" or whatever it is you love, all pigments fade when exposed to the sun. Both CV and visible sunlight contribute to the process of fading colors, but it's that nasty old UV that is also the culprit in a lot of skin problems. When it comes to color, radiation from the sun attacks the chemical bonds that absorb light. All pigments absorb light as part of their normal function. When you're looking at a red heart, the reason you see red is because the blue and the yellow are being absorbed and only the red reflected. All pigments work this way, including those used for tattoos. They absorb some colors while reflecting others. When the chemical bonds are broken down at the molecular level by the nasty UV radiation (which they also absorb, to their detriment), they lose their ability to absorb and reflect different colors. Less red is reflected and possibly also more blue anti yellow, which used to he absorbed. What we see in the end product is a less intense red. Since tattoos are generally composed of darker colors (outlines of black as just a start), they are clearly absorbing more light than not (since they are reflecting less—this is why black clothes in the summer sun make you feel much more hot than white). If you want to preserve color, then keep it in the dark, like the wall paintings in the tombs of the pharaohs.

Tattoos battle another fading mechanism as well, since they are impregnated in a living organism, also known as our skin. We already know that if the tattoo pigment has not penetrated to the dermis and has instead ended up primarily in the epidermis, then the tattoo will seem to fade as the epidermis routinely sloughs off and rejuvenates itself. The process of forming new epidermal cells that push their way up from the bottom to the top of the epidermis where they are shed, carrying tattoo pigment right along with them, is some thirty-five to forty-five days. In the truest sense, this is not a faded tattoo per se. It's an inferior one, since it never reached the dermis. Even for pigment that reaches the dermis, however, there are still some obstacles to overcome.Until your tattoo pigment has taken up permanent residence within the dermis in a fibroblast (a stringy type of cell that makes up connective tissue), your body will treat it like the foreign body that it is, attempting to capture it for escort out. The immune system tries to engulf the pigment molecule with a type of white blood cell, the largest of which is a macrophage. Sometimes the pigment molecule is ust too big, however (size does count), so the immune system may try to break it down into smaller parts by dissolving i Tattoo pigment doesn't generally just dissolve but nevertheless, over time, your immune system will capture what it can and then transport it away in the lymph system.

If you've been tattooed, the lymph nodes closest to your tattoo likely carry tattoo pigment. After all is said and done, however, the immune system carries away only a small percentage and the remainder is captured in fibroblasts.

Which colors fade the fastest? It depends on the particular molecular composition of the pigment used. Some of the chemical bonds are less stable than others. We've already seen that the ingredients in tattoo pigment are largely unknown and, if known, their composition is sometimes held like a secret. The overwhelming anecdotal evidence for tattoos, however, is that red seems to fade the fastest. In tattoos that are twenty to fifty years old, sometimes the red is completely gone.

Best Defense

The best defense in the skin game is not necessarily a good offense. The best defense in the battle of fading tattoos is to combat tattoo enemy number one, the sun, by running away. The easiest and the most effective thing to do is cover the tattoo with clothing. A tattoo that is done well in the first place, healed properly, and protected from light can remain vibrant for many decades. Ironically, of course, this isn't why many people get a tattoo. They get it to show it. So if you gotta show it, then show it indoors. If you gotta show it outdoors, do it in the winter on a cloudy day. If you gotta show it outdoors in the summer, do it in the early morning or late afternoon. And if you show it outdoors at all, use sunblock, always, always, always, even in winter on a cloudy day.

Sunblock and sunscreen are not created equal. A sunscreen chemically absorbs the UV radiation, not unlike the melanin naturally present in your skin, attempting to prevent as many of the rays from reaching your skin as possible. Sunscreens are generally transparent after they've been rubbed in. A sunhlock actually physically blocks the sun from hitting your skin. You're probably familiar with the white nose treatment that lifeguards and sailing competitors wear. Those are examples of sunblocks, probably white zinc oxide. However, sunblocks don't necessarily need to look like geisha makeup. 'Today they are available in a microbead form that is also transparent. The American Cancer Society recommends a sunscreen or sunblock rated at least SPF 15 in order to protect your skin from the damaging rays of the sun. Applying it correctly is also a must as long as you're going to use it: apply twenty minutes before being in the sun, twenty minutes after (think of it as the second coat of paint that gets the thin spots), and every two hours after that. As you may recall, your tattoo resides in your dennis while the cells that create a suntan and natural skin color reside in your epidermis. That means that your tattoo will not protect you from a sunburn in that spot. What's good for your skin is good for your tattoo. Neither is maintenance free when treated right.

Stretch and Shrink

Tattoos will stretch and shrink, but only within limits. Moderate and gradual weight gain or loss will have little effect on a tattoo except to stretch and shrink it accordingly. Think of birthday balloons that are slightly overinflated and underinflated. You can still read "Happy Birthday" pretty easily and the letters maintain their relative spacing and composition. However, other types of rapid weight gain or loss could be another matter. For example, women who are considering having children might want to think twice about an abdominal tattoo placement. Similarly, men who are planning on getting seriously into bodybuilding might want to reconsider their upper armband. Stretch marks (often associated with pregnancy but which can also afflict all women as well as men) can also appear on the arms, thighs, and buttocks and even the hips and lower back.

Blur

Tattoos will blur for some of the same reasons that they fade. As the chemical bonds are broken and the molecules begin to break down as a result of exposure to the sun, the body's immune system, always on the prowl, will attempt to take the smaller molecules away. In addition, tattoos on areas of the body that stretch constantly (the elbows, knees, ankles, feet, and even hands) will also blur more easily over time, for all the masons that we've discussed above. Tattoos done in skin that has already been damaged by overexposure to the sun also seem to he more susceptible to blurring, with the skin less able to hold the ink securely in position.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

Tattoos change over time but there are simple and commonsense steps that can mitigate unwanted changes, perhaps even preventing them completely. Tattoo artists are loath to give a number on how many years a tattoo will last (which is essentially forever) or how long it will look good (which is so variable that there's no good answer). The way a tattoo holds up over time is so dependent on its initial quality, the healing period, its maintenance, and the variations of people's skins that it is impossible to predict. Even a well-executed, simple, lettered word, for example, placed on the knuckles and never covered in the sun, might begin to blur and fade in its first summer, especially given the stretching of the skin over the joints. The same exact lettering, however, on the back of the shoulder, which healed properly, never saw the light of day, and never suffered excessive stretching or shrinking, might remain nearly as crisp and legible in its second decade as it did in its second week.

Finally, though, let us acknowledge that as the skin naturally ages, the look of our tattoos changes as well. Age spots and wrinkles take their toll on the clarity and pristine color of our tattoos. Given enough time, even the boldest and darkest outline softens, inevitably blurring to a minute extent. The lines appear to grow ever so slightly thicker and the gaps between them seem to narrow, sometimes even disappearing. Shading that was once bright and solid becomes a touch less immediate and vibrant. Pigment is moving imperceptibly over time on a cellular level as the elasticity and resilience of our skin naturally declines. For these changes that come simply as a result of time, there is no escape—for our skins, our tattoos, or ourselves. Instead, only our attitudes toward that process count and dictate whether we see an aging tattoo as attractive or not.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/art-articles/tattoo-aftercare-guide-235403.html
About the Author:
Tattoo Guide, Symbol, Meaning, Photos Images Gallery and Tattoo Culture History around the world www.tattoobody.org

Script and Tattoo Lettering Designs

Meaningful Art Written In Words

Lettering TattooTattoos using letter and script designs became popular in the past with bikers and incarcerated inmates. But today many people of all walks of life are getting this style of tattoo, making it even more popular. Tattoo enthusiasts find a lot of meaningful usage with letters and script in their designs. Individuals usually get letter tattoos to express something they want to say or hold dear to them. Some people like to add names with script or letters because it is a simple way to represent a statement using words instead of a picture design.

Script letters can be eye-catching and hold deep meanings form the words they use. Individuals like to use letters and script tattoos to convey different messages and even dates of many special occasions. Script and letter tattoos can be used in a commemorating tattoo, a memorial tattoo, an anniversary tattoo, a birth of a baby tattoo and many other special moments in life that people want to have close as a keepsake of remembrance. Quote tattoos are in the same realm using both letters and script. Famous verses from the bible are sometimes tattooed. Well known and common saying such as "Only God Can Judge Me" or quotes from a famous poet are some favorites.

Like most other tattoos, personality is always added to the overall design. The size of the tattoo can be simple and small like adding a name to the banner of a heart tattoo or it can be made huge such as adding a name or a quote along the stretch of the back using big letters from shoulder to shoulder. A script or letter tattoo can be blended with many other tattoo designs also. Using letters and script can make a tattoo design more attractive and appealing.

Finding the right style and font can be easily done by just choosing the one you like the best or your letters can be custom made to your taste. A wide variety of fonts can be found online. A good place to start looking online for cool font ideas for a tattoo is DaFont dot com or you can visit your local library. You can also have your tattoo artist design something to your liking using their own talent and skills.

10 most popular letters and script commonly used for tattoos:


  1. Old English

  2. Tribal

  3. Calligraphy

  4. Cursive

  5. Old School

  6. Roman

  7. Gothic

  8. Handwritten

  9. Celtic

  10. Graffiti

Letters and script tattoos can be inked with bold colors or plain black. Good detail shading adds a lot of character and elegance to the letters making them standout more. Letters can also be decorated with fancy scroll-work to enhance them further, the choice is yours. So if your thinking about getting a new tattoo involving letters and script you should spend a little time on your decision about which style of font is a good choice for you and your tattoo design.

Come see the various popular styles of tattoo fonts and discover more ideas for tattoos.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Naipua_Allen

http://EzineArticles.com/?Script-and-Tattoo-Lettering-Designs&id=4460252


Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Innovative Ideas for Women Tattoos

Women TattoosTattoos have become very popular and have been embodied by many women in society today. Tattoos for women have brought out a style that has left a statement that entails their personality. Many women flaunt their lifestyle and fashion in their tattoo designs. Decades ago tattoos weren’t very favorable among many and a woman sporting a tattoo wasn’t deemed respectful. Today society has had a change of heart as tattoos are widely accepted and respected for its meanings. Tattoos have now developed into an artistry and culture tradition much like those of native traditional tattoos. Now women adorning tattoos are looked upon as very appealing and elegant.

Women Rose Tattoo Designs
Women Rose Tattoo


Women Tattoo DesignsWomen tattoos are among the prettiest designs compared to men tattoos which are more boldly in design. Women seem to prefer a more delicate and beautiful tattoo designs. Women tattoos also range in many different sizes and colors. Some get tattoos that are small and intricate, while other women desire a large tattoo design that can cover their entire upper back or arm sleeves. Today there are a lot of tattoo designs for women, choosing a design can be made by what you want to interpret or convey in a tattoo. Here are a few tattoo ideas for women that can help you find that perfect tattoo design.

Popular Tattoo Ideas for Women

1. Butterfly tattoos - A simple tattoo and a favorite among women.

2. Tribal tattoos: Women have come to recognize this design as being exotic and alluring.

3. Star tattoos: One of the most recognized symbol of many cultures, stars bear a long history in tattoos.

4. Flower tattoos: Flowers are really precious to a women as they accentuate beauty all by themselves.

5. Zodiac tattoos: The star signs of the zodiac is very popular among both men and woman.

6. Angel tattoos: The protection and comfortable feeling you get when thinking of angels is why so many adopt this spiritual being to tattoos.

7. Heart tattoos: The symbol of life and love, heart tattoos has always been a popular tattoo design.

8. Fairy tattoos: A innocent and mischievous tattoo design is the fairy tattoos.

9. Celtic tattoos: Much like the tribal, Celtic tattoos have become very popular amongst women due to the interweaving or interlocking patterns that make up this sophisticated design.

10. Sun tattoos: One of natures important elements in the sustenance of life is the sun.

Monday, June 21, 2010

gothic tattoo designs

Some believe that Goth's are only fascinated with death and are a very morbid group. However, this is a grave misunderstanding and an over simplification of the Goth sub culture. These people are way to eclectic to be summer up in one simple statement.

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gothic tattoo designs

There are many that have a fascination with the dark side of humans and even death. However, many that are into Goth are highly artistic, unique and like to stress their individuality and separation from mainstream society. As a result most Goth people like to enhance their overall image and body with tattoos. This has a lead to a whole area of tattoo designs called Gothic Tattoos.

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tattoo designs black

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tattoo designs black

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dragon tattoo designs black

Sunday, June 20, 2010

tribal upper arm tattoo

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tribal upper arm tattoo

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tribal upper arm tattoo 2

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tribal upper arm tattoo 3

Tribal arm tattoos designs

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Tribal arm tattoos designs

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Tribal arm tattoos designs 2

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Tribal arm tattoos designs 3

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Saturday, June 19, 2010

nautical star tattoos on chest

Nautical star tattoos have a very long history, complete with a lot of controversial meanings. nautical star tattoos meanings. Most of the people believe them to symbolize strength and protection. They are considered to be originated from the sailor community, which relied upon the North star, for navigation in the sea.

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Since, they thought this star ensured their safe trip home, they believed this star to be a lucky charm and hence, they started tattooing themselves with this star tattoo. A nautical star tattoo is a five armed star, with each arm divided into two symmetrical parts by a straight line. Now, let us take a look at nautical star tattoos on chest.

Nautical Star Tattoos on Chest
When you want to have a nautical star tattoo on your chest, you can go for a single large nautical star in the middle of the chest or you can get a tattoo with a group of nautical stars. These stars can be placed in various artistic manners. Nautical star tattoos are sculpted to give a three dimensional effect, hence they make some of the best tattoos on chest. A nautical star tattoo on chest is gaining popularity, specially among men.

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Read more on, nautical star tattoos for guys and nautical star tattoos for girls. Since, chest provides a large area for tattooing, you can place the nautical star tattoo anywhere. Though, there are not too many variations in the nautical star tattoos designs, but still a lot of experiments can be done with colors. Nautical star tattoo with wings are also among some of the beautiful designs, carved as chest tattoos. Alternate colors are used to fill the nautical star tattoo and most of these colors are dark and bright.

nautical star tattoos on chest Pictures, Images and Photos